Posts Tagged “yoga”

Lesroy Markman-Jones

Lesroy Markman-Jones

I use my experiences as an IFBB bodybuilder to teach the new generation

After nearly 10 years in the transport industry I decided I needed to pursue a new career in fitness as I felt I had done all I could in transport and felt it was time for me to develop myself further.

Training and exercise has always been a part of my life but now it has become one of my main sources of motivation.

 

I want to learn more to be better in this area seeking always to improve upon my knowledge and love to pass that on and encourage others to develop there selves through their own passion in health and fitness.

 

My own passion, has brought me to competing as a bodybuilder, becoming a personal trainer and making a living from doing what I love.

Why not share the opportunities I now have with others. Tutoring is a natural step for me in my own journey. I want your journey to be as unique as you are and SFE-Academy is here so you can develop exactly how you wish to through your passion.

 

 My Interests

I have an interest in callisthenics. Being able to control the body’s movements with strength and skill is a very impressive ability both gymnasts and street dancers have.

CrossFit is another interesting field of exercise and fitness. Testing fitness in all areas including mental toughness.

Bodybuilding is where I’m most at home. I enjoy the discipline and training, food and lifestyle that goes along with the art form.

 

My experiences

 

Bogus trainers and a cluttered fitness training market.

Bogus trainers and a cluttered fitness training market.

Bogus trainers and a cluttered fitness training market.

 

 

The health and fitness industry has grown and as a nation we are becoming more interested in alternative health regimes. The fitness industry has grown in popularity around the world and alternative well-being is top of the agenda. Keeping fit and valuing our well-being, is highly recommended by personal trainers, doctors and other health practitioners to their patients. Furthermore, as an industry, we search out an instructor who can introduce us to a safe practice and have the right qualities and competencies to be a trainer.

 

A recent experience rushing from my daily chores to my yoga class, I but found a cover teacher instead. Yes, I was a little disappointed but inside my chattering mind, I thought just ‘give it a go’. As the class went on, I wasn’t assured by her practice. I felt there was no connection between her students and no flow and no adaptation to my needs made in the class. No encouragement and no emotional quotient. Yoga is supposed to be about looking inward and having a mind-body connection, not about posing.

 

What do others in the health and fitness industry say?

Ali Valdez sums up the health and fitness fitness industry and how the lack of knowledge, philosophy or emotional maturity to your practice can be detrimental to clients. “The fitness phenomenon has grown to big business, you can become a yoga instructor doing a 200 hour certificate program! Fantastic article on bogus trainers that don’t reflect the meditative skills, physical and spiritual guidance associated with genuine trainers.”

I’ve recently questioned the fitness industry as a whole and in the UK. There are no official qualifications required to teach yoga, so anyone can technically create a class and charge the “I saw you coming prices” for one to one lessons. Paul Fox from The British Wheel of Yoga (BWY) explains. That the fitness industry has become ‘shorter, less-vigorous, cheaper courses, which are mopping up the increasing appetite for teacher training.’

 

Bogus trainers and a cluttered fitness training market.

The way forward…

So, here’s my conclusion, to all this confusion the fitness industry if you are planning to step into any instruction programme. I would invest in time and money with accredited certification. Surely, there is a ‘duty of care’ as an instructor to provide validity as a qualified trainer. Therefore, protect the consumer. The potential consequences of this lack of regulation are poor competencies, potential injury to the client, and poor public perception of personal trainers. Additionally, it isn’t known whether personal trainers are meeting the needs of their clients. The criteria used in hiring them seems not to be clear.

Finally, I think that with the right tools trainers should project lifelong gains and to deliver the correct training processes. It is in the best interests of the  training establishments that there is available support to deliver high quality, professional and a confident approach.

Bogus trainers? Maybe. A way forward for for the industry? to coin a phrase ” Things can only get better”

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